Monthly Archives: May 2019

“First Mother’s Day without Mom” by Ginger Dehlinger

It’s a sunny day in May
and I’m pushing a wheeled cart
through the aisles of the supermarket.

Other Saturday shoppers are doing the same,
and though I’m not usually interested
I look in every basket I pass.
Blind to the bread, lettuce and eggs,
my eyes rest on balloons, cards,
flowers and small beribboned packages.

How paltry is my pantry;
how blue and bereft my basket
compared to theirs.

I watch a store employee
dip strawberries in melted chocolate
then roll them in candy sprinkles.

Mom loved those decadent treats,
so I nestle a colorful dozen
in my basket of gray merchandise.

Ahead of me in the long checkout line
a pink teddy bear sits atop a loaded cart.
Avoiding his shiny stare I look away.

To my right is a display of potted plants
(orchids, mini roses, African violets)
some large, others small and green.

A shopper is picking up plants,
looking at price labels, sniffing blossoms,
debating which one to buy.

“Take the roses,” I want to tell her.
“Take the roses.”

Ginger Dehlinger writes in multiple genres. Her poetry and short stories have appeared in several e-zines and anthologies. Most of her work is set in the West including two novels, Brute Heart (Oregon) and Never Done (Colorado). Ginger lives in Bend, OR with her husband and a cat, both spoiled.

Somebody Else’s Poetry by Ella Baum

We’re always sorry,

Our body’s architecture
Is Syntactically off.
We end poems on commas,
And find sleeping with masks on
Hard work.

Because sh(hh) is half the syllable of she,
The characters we play
Are somebody else’s poetry.

But text doesn’t have to be the driving force.
Our bodies are as important as our voices –
That’s what my ear told me.

Identity stripped
Of performance,
Mythology,
We are remodeled –
The shadow that completes the window.

Fences don’t protect from everything
And trauma hides behind the beautiful

It’s such a good line. I wish
It lingered more,

Ella Baum is currently a junior studying at Vassar college in Poughkeepsie, New York. She is an English major and photographer interested in the expressive potential of sister arts. Ella is a bilingual, dual citizen of America and Sweden and feels indebted to the New York City public school system which spurred her interest in poetry and the potential of language. 

“Protection” by F.I. Goldhaber

True Pacific
Northwesterners love
our rain. We
only dig
out umbrellas to shelter
us from summer’s sun.

F.I. Goldhaber’s words capture people, places, and events with a photographer’s eye and a poet’s soul. Paper, electronic, and audio magazines, books, newspapers, calendars, and street signs display their poetry, fiction, and essays. More than 100 of their poems appear in fifty plus publications including four volumes of poetry. http://www.goldhaber.net/